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Follow her as she prepares and partakes the "bread for the stomach" in http://beforesixdiet.blogspot.com/ . And while you are full at it, she offers you the "bread for the soul" in her travels by foot and by thoughts in http://footandfire.blogspot.com/ Happy Reading!

Friday, December 12, 2014

Island Garden City of Samal, Davao Del Norte: Amik, Isda Sa bato, Binignet and other food offerings


Amik looks like bihon (our local dried noodle made of cassava or corn) but more fragile. It is crunchy, sweet and oily. According to the locals, this is the food of the Muslims when it is Ramadan.

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We bought one piece to sample "Amik," a food prepared with so much care as according to our host, Sir Roger de la Cruz, it will never form in oil like this if the one who cooks is a sinner. Well, as an aspiring cook, I am challenged to do this some time.

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Seaweeds abound Samal and one should not leave the island without tasting at least this kind 
that has the soft jelly texture.

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This seaweed is my favorite because it has the crunch, a perfect characteristic for salad.

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Panga ng Tuna or Tuna Jaw is best accompanied by these two seaweed salad. 
Courtesy of our host, Sir Roger.

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I can't leave Samal without sampling the Isda sa Bato, fishes that are colored when in water and looks like they should go to the aquarium rather than in my bowl.

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Yes, Just like our lugaw or linugaw, Samal has Binignet too.

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We had this Langka Delight. Milky Icecream topped with Langka preserve.
Just like Razon's take on the halo-halo with Banana preserve top only.


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Crunchy Patatas but it's not made of patato.

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We bought Mango Yema and Langka Yema sweets as pasalubong 
from Island Garden City of Samal, Davao Del Norte

Monday, November 17, 2014

Kansi with native Pechay in Chinese Five Spice



For this beef soup, use beef with bones which carry the marrow. This is a no-sweat beef soup. The trick is to quickly boil the beef and remove the froths and sediments forming above the water. Put more water and bring to boil until the meat is tender (This is the waiting part especially if there is no pressure cooker in the house). While boiling, put the Chinese Five Spice (Please see earlier post).

I have Cinnamon sticks and star anise in the house, so aside from the powder, I put some of it as I love the woody and earthy aroma of these two spices. 

If the meat is tender, adjust taste with pepper and salt. When done with the taste, put the trimmed native pechay  and let vegetable cook covered for one to two minutes . Serve piping hot.   


Sunday, November 16, 2014

Chinese Five Spice and its many variations




This packet is a gift from a good friend who now works in Beijing, China. It says "Ginger Poweder" but from what I can understand from the photo, it is more like what we came to know as Chinese Five Spice. I wonder why they did not name it so. I googled and found these suggestion on how to make your DIY spice combination. This is perfect for beef stews and beef soups and stocks. Here are the varied stuff I found and brace yourself as I will post the ingredients which were posted at the back of this luckily in English: It is not five only.



1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon fennel seed, toasted and ground
1 teaspoon ground star anise
1 teaspoon szechuan peppercorns, toasted and ground


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1 tsp. ground Szechwan pepper
1 tsp. ground star anise
1-1/4 tsp. ground fennel seeds
1/2 tsp. ground cloves
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. ground white pepper

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Anise, Cinnamon, Star Anise, Cloves, Ginger

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2 tablespoons ground star anise
2 tablespoons ground fennel seeds
2 teaspoons crushed cassia
2 teaspoons crushed Szechuan peppercorns
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

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Combine ground star anise, ground fennel seeds, 
crushed cassia*, crushed Szechuan peppercorns, and ground cloves.

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The packet above contains Aniseed, Chinese prickly ash*, Chinese Cinnamon, dry ginger,
anise, dried orange peel, strawberry.



*Please see the difference between cinnamon and cassia here.
*Chinese prickly ash is also known as Szechuan peppercorns.





Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Myanmarese's Laphet


Laphet thoke is another symbolic dish of Burma, albeit a snack. It consists of pickled tea leaves soaked in oil eaten with an assortment of fritters including roasted groundnuts, deep fried garlic, sun dried prawns, toasted sesame and deepfried crispy beans. Laphet is served in a traditional 'oat' - a lacquer container with individual compartments for each ingredients. Lahpet was an ancient symbolic peace offering between warring kingdoms in the history of Myanmar, and is exchanged and consumed after settling a dispute.

Monday, August 25, 2014

San Carlos City, Negros Occidental foodfare: Bukayo, Skinless Mani, and Salbaro


Bukayo is the popular food fare in Sipaway Island 
since the island is littered with numbered coconut trees.
In the photo is a hot and just-cooked bukayo. 
When each piece cools down, it hardens.

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Chay Nene's Bucayo is prepared straight from her kitchen.

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Salbaro is a local bread cooked with coconut milk and flour.
Also called "pan de bisaya."

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Little bandi, peanut in solidified sugar syrup.
Peanut Lumpia, peanut mixture wrapped in lumpia wrapper.

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Baked peanuts (above). Less oil salted skinless peanut (below).


Saturday, August 23, 2014

Our Giant Backyard Jackfruit



Juicy, ripe, yellow, luscious,  sweet, crunchy crisp, fresh, organic.
These are what we blurted about our Giant Jackfruit.
Hopefully, we can have one more giant next year!


From my June 26, 2014 post:
An amazing 22-inch tall jackfruit, a first pick from our tree. 
Must be weighing 30 kilos...46 inch in diameter. Awesome!



Sweet, juicy and plump segment of the fruit.


One last look....

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Three Kinds of Salad Dressings


*Honey-Olive oil- Calamansi

Honey
Olive Oil
Calamansi
Italian seasoning (dry herbs)
salt

Put all ingredients in a cup with lid cover. 
Shake before drizzling to salads. 




*Mango Salsa

Ripe mango, cubed
Olive oil
Italian seasoning (dry herbs)
salt

Put all ingredients in a cup with lid cover. 
Shake before drizzling to favorite salad. 



*Quick Thousand Island's Dressing 

Mayonnaise
Ketchup
Italian seasoning (dry herbs)

Mix ingredients in a plate.
Serve as side with favorite greens.





Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Tuna balls skewers




Canned tuna (include water)
minced garlic
minced onion
salt and pepper
flour
baking powder
egg
Italian seasoning (dry herbs)
Canola oil for deep frying.

How to:
Put canned tuna in a bowl.
Add garlic, onion and salt and pepper.
Add flour enough to form balls, baking powder and scrambled egg
Add Italian seasoning.
Form the mixture into small balls.
Deep fry in canola oil.
Serve skewered with sweet and sour ketchup on the side.




Sunday, August 17, 2014

Stirfried beef and big bellpeppers



Canola oil
crushed and minced garlic
minced onions
200 grams ground beef
salt and pepper 
Worcestershire sauce
soy sauce
500 grams big bellpeppers (about 125gms each piece) sliced lengthwise
little water
chopped celery or onion leaves

 Saute onion and garlic in oil.
Add beef and simmer for at least three minutes.
Add salt, pepper Worcestershire sauce and sauce according to taste.
Place the bellpeppers and little water if needed. Let cook a bit.
Top with celery before removing from fire.


Sunday, August 3, 2014

Traditional Myanmar Dinner

From Left to right: A salty gravy which must be made of fish; roasted beans; fried garlic slices, small dried shrimps, and a dish like laing (made of gabi tubers with salty fish) or this must be the pickled tea leaves, I am not sure. These are complimentary to the orders of Rice and fish/meat, and served as dips for raw and steamed vegetables.

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The yellowing leaves are tough but they were served steamed, must be tree leaves; the miniature eggplants which were steamed, raw carrots, raw calamansi leaves, and another steamed green leaves, must be the tops of squash or sayote. These are dipped in the condiments and serve as side dish for the main dish of rice and fish/meat. I tried tearing up the calamnsi leaves and mix with my rice, they make my rice fragrant and savory, just like our pandan leaves. Another idea in serving rice!

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A soup made of potato, sweet potato or squash. 
Very thin one so that I cannot really identify.

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Two more saucers of red, which is mild chili for dips 
and the shredded white thing is shredded mango chutney. all for appetizer.

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Myanmarese serve unlimited rice as it is their tradition to give more rice until the guest say no. Diners intending on having another helping of rice, should leave some unfinished rice as a signal more is wanted. Rice and curry are to be eaten together rather than separately and soup can be taken at intervals. At the conclusion of the meal, deserts such as laphet, fruit or jaggery may be served along with water, green tea or juice. Laphet or pickled tea leaves with a dash of oil and served with sesame seeds, fried garlic and roasted peanuts, is another popular snack typical of Myanmar, served in a circular dish. More information here.


Saturday, June 28, 2014

Stir fried Beef and Broccoli


1 tablespoon Canola Oil
1 tablespoon of crushed Garlic
1 large Onion, cubed
1 kilo beef tenderloin cut in strips
1 kilo Broccoli
1 can button mushrooms
bellpeppers
4 tablespoons of olives
2-3 table spoons cornstarch
saved water from canned mushroom
salt and pepper to taste


Cut meat in strips. Cut the broccoli flowers from the stem and separate into desired sizes. Remove hard outer portions of the stem until the soft center reveals. Cut into bite size. Dissolve 2-3 tablespoons of cornstarch in a bowl of water.

In a wok, saute garlic and onion in oil, put the beef tenderloin and cover for three minutes. Remove impurities from the beef liquid, put a little salt and pepper and let cook for another two minutes. Put small amount of water or liquid from the canned mushroom, then place the broccoli, mushroom and bell peppers. Let cook for two to three minutes. Put sliced olives and the liquid from the canned mushroom. Add salt and pepper to taste. Let simmer for one minute. Add the dissolved cornstarch, stir to make sure the starch does not settle at the bottom. Let simmer and adjust taste with salt and pepper. Add soy sauce or oyster sauce if desired.


Note: Another way of cooking this is to steam or saute the broccoli separately. Serve beef and brocoli together in a plate.

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

What Myanmar fed us: vegetables, fish, chicken, and unlimited rice!


This is the five-color vegetables we ordered. We got a beautiful line up of stir-fried sweet peas, napa cabbage, young corn, cauliflower and carrots. We had this in Mandalay, but as in anywhere in Myanmar, vegetables are a side dish or a complimentary dish aside from the soup and mango chutney and fermented fish/prawns.

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This is one tasty fish which is first wrapped with chopped leaves which preserved the fish fat (see bottom layer) and spices before the banana leaves. This must be steamed and the fish meat (see the second layer) is very tasty while the skin is delicately smooth. I want to replicate this cooking. We had this in a Shan Restaurant in Mandalay near our hotel.

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Fish hot clay pot. Chunks of fried fish with vegetables and spices and visibly garnished with onion rings and pineapple slices. This is one nice rice partner. It is served in a small wok with a burner underneath. We had this in Bagan.

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Speaking of snacks, I like this deep-fried potato chips at 500 to 1000 kyatts (23 to 46 php), it is worth a try. Nest to this locally made treat is the tamarind chip (not pictured) which is a candied tamarind served in thin round pieces of ten in each fold. 

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 This is the ultimate surprise among what I had. A fruit that looks like Jackfruit, Smells like Jackfruit but each piece of flesh and seed picks like Marang and Feels like Marang and the taste is interesting Jackfruit and Marang. We had this in Mt. Popa area where fruits and vegetables abound.

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Gingered steamed fish in light soy/fish sauce. 
We had this in a Shan State restaurant in Yangon.

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Light floured and fried Catfish in Ginger and Chili oil. This goes well with unlimited rice which the Myanmarese instantly serves while one's plate and stomach is open. (Yangon)

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Another delectable fried fish with vegetables and soy and bean sauce. (Yangon)

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On our way to Bagan, we stopped at the 24-hour restaurant in an express highway and our driver had this. I dipped the round eggplant and alas! it was raw, to my surprise. Though I eat vegetables but I did not like my first bite... Other greens are friendly though. The dip is like fermented fish, and it must be....
 (En route to Bagan)


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Upon arriving Mandalay, we were given this free and extra treat aside from our main orders we had. Clockwise, the sauce is vinegared, then the fried bean or nuts, then the fried garlic, then the dried shrimp (like ours) and a fermented leaves that must be tea cooked/tasted like our local "laing." We had this in Mandalay.

This must be the Laphet thoke which the wikipedia describes as a symbolic dish of Burma, albeit a snack. It consists of pickled tea leaves soaked in oil eaten with an assortment of fritters including roasted groundnuts, deep fried garlic, sun dried prawns, toasted sesame and deepfried crispy beans. Laphet is served in a traditional 'oat' - a lacquer container with individual compartments for each ingredients. Lahpet was an ancient symbolic peace offering between warring kingdoms in the history of Myanmar, and is exchanged and consumed after settling a dispute.

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Dreaming of this thin yellow noodles from a Chinese noodle house in Mandalay, Myanmar. I also liked their chicken, it's tasty like our "native chicken." This serving is actually good for two persons but I finished it all nice and clean. At 1,800 kyatt (P85php) this is one good treat. Myanmarese food is influenced by Indian, Chinese and Thai cuisines.

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Fish with watercress a.k.a. kangkong.  
Yummy and of course, I can recreate this.

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Our last meal is not grand but it was paid for. We found 5000 kyatts on the dark street; so aside from this last supper in Yangon consisting of fried noodle topped with fried egg and cooked with plenty of oil topped before it was topped with pre-cooked chicken,  we were able to share tip to our baggage carrier and driver the next day. We liked the noodle which is very much like our pansit mami but the oil made me heady.

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Mandalay, Myanmar: fruits, ice cream and more street foods


ULTIMATE MYANMARESE STREET FOOD: Pig mask and other internal organs in sticks. One has to cook it by dipping it in a boiling liquid in the center. The containers on the side are the condiments and the red ones must be chili...

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Watermelon for 900 kyatts.

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The whitish green watermelon.

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Sayote or squash leaves.

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Melon.

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I'm holding a honeydew.

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Golden-orange Papaya.

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Some deep-fried stuff: crabs, shrimps and some floured food.

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Just like the Thai papaya pickle. The woman is using the mortar and pestle to mash the spices and then she adds this to the raw green papaya.

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Must be jelly sweets.

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Cold desserts to quench the sun-dried palates.

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Ice cream from Nylon Ice cream parlor. 
Quite a following among the locals for this dirty a.k.a. home-made ice cream.

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Rainbow ice cream. Choices vary from tropical fruit like Durian to the classic ones 
like chocolate and vanilla. 

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